11 Must-Try Edamame Recipes (2024)

We always buy frozen edamame with the best of intentions. But more often than not, we use it for icing our sore joints instead of in a delicious meal.

As important as post-workout R&R is, we say it’s time to let edamame live up to its full potential. These 11 frozen edamame recipes are so tasty and easy, you may never end up with extra bags in your freezer again.

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1. Cashew crunch salad with sesame dressing

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Cabbage salads are tricky. The veggie produces so many shredded leaves that it feels impossible to use them all — especially when recipes call for green and purple varieties. (There’s only so much cabbage one can eat!)

This salad, however, changes the game. It’s so crunchy and satisfying that you’ll actually look forward to leftovers all week. And since cabbage is so dense, you won’t have to worry about it getting flat and lifeless like other greens.

Another bonus: It tastes good with all kinds of protein. Chicken, shrimp, tofu… you really can’t go wrong.

2. Edamame, cranberry, and feta salad

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Simple, savory, sweet — this salad checks all the boxes. It also makes a snazzy side dish or snack.

Simply defrost frozen edamame, toss with cranberries and olive oil, stir in feta crumbles, and cover with freshly cracked black pepper.

We also love stuffing the salad into a pita pocket and adding diced cucumber and red onion to turn it into a full meal.

3. Asian broccoli salad with peanut sauce

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Some ingredients are just made for each other — like broccoli and edamame. What strengthens their union even more? Peanut sauce.

To make the most of these triple-threat flavors, boil or roast broccoli florets, toss with edamame and chopped peanuts, mix in the peanut sauce, and top with scallions and sesame seeds.

The perfect side for sautéed chicken breast or tofu, this salad will make anyone a fan of broccoli — yes, even the kiddos.

4. Cucumber edamame salad with ginger-soy vinaigrette

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Zucchini shouldn’t have all the fun. This recipe skips the squash and opts for crunchy cucumber as its spiralized veggie of choice.

Mixed with red bell pepper, jalapeño, edamame, and a homemade ginger vinaigrette, it’s perfect as a light dinner after a heavy day of eating — we’ve all been there — or as a simple weekday lunch.

Add shrimp or salmon for some more protein and toasted sesame seeds for a little extra color and flavor.

5. Easy edamame dip

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For those moments when you’re looking for a fresh dip for your pita chips, reach for frozen edamame.

Made with garlic, olive oil, lemon, and fresh herbs (basil is our fave), this dip will be gone in less time than you’ll spend making it. In fact, you may even want to double the recipe — particularly if you’re hosting.

6. Crispy Parmesan garlic edamame

Anything with Parmesan and garlic in the title is bound to be the bomb, right? This portable snack is a snap, requiring just a quick coating of spices and cheese and a stint in the oven until the cheese is all browned and melted.

The garlic complements the edamame’s flavor without overpowering it, and the cheese turns these pods into bite-size snacks with a satisfying crunch.

7. Super greens healthy pasta salad

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Edamame is often used as a substitute for chickpeas, but in this recipe, they become a dream team. (Oh, and peas join the party too.)

Simply cook the orzo, add the frozen ingredients just before it’s done boiling, drain, add the chickpeas and spices along with a splash with olive oil, and voila! You can now enjoy your comforting bowl of goodness.

For a little extra flavor, add a drizzle of thick balsamic or top with red pepper flakes.

8. Edamame hummus

Betcha haven’t tried this hummus variety before! To balance the flavor of edamame, amp up the lemon juice and tahini for a perfect dipping sauce you’ll keep coming back to.

Simply defrost the edamame and blend the ingredients. The finished product is a beautiful pastel green, but you class it up even more with a drizzle of olive oil, some fresh cilantro leaves, and a few sesame seeds.

9. Edamame falafel sandwiches

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Here’s another fun spin on beloved Mediterranean cuisine. Edamame stands in for chickpeas to create St. Patrick’s-worthy falafels (with the help of parsley and scallions too).

Enjoy them covered in a garlic-herb spread and nestled between spinach leaves. Feel free to use whatever sauces you please — hummus, harissa, tzatziki — and get creative with toppings. (Though pickled onions and Kalamata olives are a great choice, if we may say so.)

10. Beef and broccoli edamame stir-fry

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We have some serious beef with this recipe. Just kidding! Easy and tasty, this recipe can do no wrong.

Homemade sauce is splashed on thin strips of flank steak (chicken or shrimp would taste great too) and mixed with broccoli, edamame, and brown rice for a filling, flavorful, and easy weeknight dinner.

Feel free to substitute store-bought teriyaki sauce if you’re short on time (or ingredients), but keep an eye out for added sugars.

11. Tahini edamame burger

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Black bean burgers, lentil burgers, mushroom burgers… the list of vegetarian burger options runs deep. But edamame burgers? This was news to our ears — and boy, are we glad we heard it.

The frozen soybeans are mixed with the likes of sweet potato, garlic, onion, oats, greens, and a heap of spices and sauces (like tahini) to create the most savory veggie burger we’ve ever tasted.

Serve with whole grain mustard, barbecue sauce, hummus, tzatziki, or any other accoutrements, and feel free to freeze the leftovers (they thaw like champs).

Who knew these little soybeans could be so versatile? We certainly didn’t, but now a bag of frozen edamame is a grocery trip staple.

If you really want to end your green cooking spree on an interesting note, you could be adventurous and try this edamame ice cream recipe (WTF?!), but we’ll leave that one up to you.

11 Must-Try Edamame Recipes (2024)

FAQs

How do you make edamame taste better? ›

A classic duo of rice vinegar and flaky sea salt ensure edamame hits every salty, savory, tangy punch when the snack-time craving hits. In a medium bowl toss 1 1/2 cups of unshelled, heated edamame with 1 tablespoon rice vinegar and flaky sea salt, until well-coated.

What does edamame go well with? ›

Edamame has a mild flavor and fresh texture that makes it a great addition to all different kinds of meals, whether that be a noodle soup, a zesty, slaw-style salad, or a bowl of fried rice. I prefer to buy it frozen because you can trust that it won't go bad before you're ready to use it.

What is the healthiest way to eat edamame? ›

Salads. Shelled edamame are a great way to add plant-based protein, flavor, and hearty texture to a salad. Keep frozen shelled edamame as a freezer staple for a quick and easy no-cook protein.

Do you have to cook frozen shelled edamame before eating? ›

Yes! The edamame seeds are incredibly difficult to remove when raw. Fortunately, they slip out easily once the pods are cooked. Also, if you're cooking edamame from the frozen state, remember that for food safety, all frozen vegetables (including edamame) should be thoroughly cooked before serving.

Why can't you reheat edamame beans? ›

The best way to reheat edamame is to microwave the edamame. This method is particularly helpful is you have a seasoning or some sauce (like soy sauce) drizzled over the bean, and you want to reheat it without the risk of all the flavors getting burnt or washed off.

Are you supposed to eat edamame pods? ›

Inside you'll find a single row of 2-5 light green, smooth seeds. Once boiled, the seeds take on a soft, creamy texture and a taste that's similar to lima beans. However, it's important to note that the pod isn't edible and should not be eaten.

Is edamame good for bowel movement? ›

One cup of edamame has 8 grams of fiber and provides 32% of the daily recommended amount. Getting fiber from eating edamame helps your body move food through your bowels more effectively and can provide relief from bloating, constipation, and hemorrhoids.

Is edamame good for your stomach? ›

A cup of edamame comprises 4 grams of fibre, which helps keep the stomach-related disorder and lowers cholesterol levels. Dietary fibre can also aid weight loss and support gut health. In addition, studies have reported a significant increase in satiety and a decrease in hunger with an increase in dietary fibre intake.

Is edamame or broccoli better for you? ›

Broccoli is an excellent source of Vitamin C. Edamame has more thiamin and folate. Both edamame and broccoli are high in calcium, dietary fiber and potassium. Broccoli is a great source of Vitamin K.

Which is healthier edamame or chickpeas? ›

"Fun fact: Edamame—immature soybeans cooked and served inside their pods—are higher in protein than chickpeas, lentils, and black beans, *and* are a good source of fiber, folate, and vitamin K."

Why is edamame a super food? ›

In addition to being a decent source of soy protein, edamame is rich in healthy fiber, antioxidants, and vitamin K. These plant compounds may reduce the risk of heart disease and improve the blood lipid profile, a measure of fats including cholesterol and triglycerides ( 7 ).

Can I eat edamame everyday? ›

While fats can be part of a healthy diet, too much fat in your diet is linked to health conditions like type 2 diabetes and obesity. Limit your risk by sticking to one ½ cup serving of edamame per day.

How long is edamame good in the fridge? ›

Edamame is rarely sold fresh, but is available frozen all year. Selection: Store fresh beans in a perforated bag in refrigerator for 4 to 5 days. Frozen beans can be stored in the freezer for up to 6 months or until the use-by date.

How do you eat edamame beans as a snack? ›

Boil them according to the package directions then dry roast in a frying pan with a sprinkle of salt. If you want a messy snack toss the whole pods with a quick sauce (like Taiji did in his video) then bite on the pod to squeeze out the beans and lick the sauce off each pod. Deliciousness!

How should edamame be served? ›

Eating edamame out of the pod is both fun and delicious. Simply steam then toss with a pinch of course salt. Serve with a bowl for the shells and enjoy! Wrap 'em!

Why can't I eat edamame pods? ›

While Epicurious notes that the shells themselves aren't toxic, they are difficult to chew and will likely be a challenge to swallow and digest. This makes them inedible, in contrast to the succulent beans they come with.

Is it better to steam or boil edamame? ›

First, bring about an inch of water to a boil in a pot. Put the edamame in a colander, steam basket, or bamboo steam tray. Once the water is boiling, add the vessel to the pot, cover, and steam the edamame until they are heated through and tender, 5 to 10 minutes.

Can you eat edamame by itself? ›

Edamame has a nutty, earthy flavor to it. Some people enjoy eating edamame by themselves as a snack, the same way you'd eat nuts or seeds.

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